Showing posts tagged repeal.
x
Ask us anything   Submit   FAQ   National Resources   

The #1 Tumblr blog for people focused on queer pride and the fight for equal rights.

Our goal is to compile inspiring posts from throughout Tumblr in one place for your convenience. PinkPanthers provides information on legislation, progress, and discrimination throughout the United States and the world. Our philosophy is that we will achieve love and equality through our strength in numbers.

With over 20,000 followers and visitors from 50+ countries, we continue to grow our community. We also urge and encourage you to submit your own pictures, stories, and news pieces!

thetrevorproject:

On the official day that DADT has been repealed, watch as this young soldier publicly comes out to his father. This video is brave, inspiring and powerful.

— 2 years ago with 278 notes
#don't ask don't tell  #DADT  #us army  #marines  #repeal  #lgbt  #coming out  #soldier  #gay 
The overturning of "don't ask, don't tell" is likely to create a ripple effect in addressing other gay-rights issues →

While critics, including Arizona GOP Sen. John McCain, said the repeal would cause a deadly distraction on the battlefield at a time of war, the lawmakers backing repeal equated the vote to other historic moments including the end of racial segregation among troops in the 1950s and the decision to allow women to attend military service academies in the 1970s.

— 3 years ago with 16 notes
#gay  #rights  #dadt  #same-sex marriage  #mccain  #repeal  #LGBTQ 
Follow us on Twitter!
@pantherspink

Follow us on Twitter!

@pantherspink

— 3 years ago with 24 notes
#ellen degeneres  #twitter  #dadt  #repeal  #LGBTQ 
A Message from Pinkpanthers: DADT

We are ecstatic to learn that “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” a 17 year old policy that prohibited gays and lesbians to serve openly in the US military has been voted to be repealed by Congress today. This achievement is important, not only to those in the military, but to all of us. We truly believe that as our government starts to acknowledge that we are equals and should be treated as such, most of society will as well. Be proud of who you are, what you can do, and the side of history that you are on. We urge you all to do some research, find out if your Representative or Senator helped in the repeal, and call and leave them a message of thanks. It is through a joint effort of our politicians, our advocates, and our hope that we have made an impact.

This is what it feels like when love wins. It does get better, and we’re glad you were here to see this day with us.

— 3 years ago with 19 notes
#it gets better  #dadt  #repeal  #love  #military  #hope  #LGBTQ 
Don’t Ask Don’t Tell repealed by Senate 65-31
In a landmark for gay rights, the Senate today voted to let gays serve openly in the military, giving President Barack Obama the chance to fulfill a campaign promise and repeal the 17-year policy known as “don’t ask, don’t tell.”Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/senate_close_to_ending_military_CWChd0bPrF46k5emweC5YK#ixzz18UvyempO

Don’t Ask Don’t Tell repealed by Senate 65-31

In a landmark for gay rights, the Senate today voted to let gays serve openly in the military, giving President Barack Obama the chance to fulfill a campaign promise and repeal the 17-year policy known as “don’t ask, don’t tell.”

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/senate_close_to_ending_military_CWChd0bPrF46k5emweC5YK#ixzz18UvyempO
— 3 years ago with 85 notes
#dadt  #repeal  #gay  #rights  #obama  #senate  #vote  #military  #LGBTQ 
Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Advances In Senate — Final Vote Likely This Weekend
December 18, 2010, 11:52AM

The Senate took a big step toward ending the military’s ban on openly  gay servicemembers today. By a vote of 63 to 33, the Senate voted to  end debate on a bill repealing the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell  policy, opening the door for a final Senate vote on the standalone  repeal bill passed by the House Tuesday. That means a simple majority of  51 Senators can now bring the legislative fight on repealing DADT to an  end. That vote is expected to come — and expected to succeed — by the  end of the weekend.
(UPDATE: The final vote is now scheduled for 3 p.m. today).

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Advances In Senate — Final Vote Likely This Weekend

The Senate took a big step toward ending the military’s ban on openly gay servicemembers today. By a vote of 63 to 33, the Senate voted to end debate on a bill repealing the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, opening the door for a final Senate vote on the standalone repeal bill passed by the House Tuesday. That means a simple majority of 51 Senators can now bring the legislative fight on repealing DADT to an end. That vote is expected to come — and expected to succeed — by the end of the weekend.

(UPDATE: The final vote is now scheduled for 3 p.m. today).

— 3 years ago with 687 notes
#dadt  #military  #gay  #rights  #repeal  #senate  #vote  #LGBTQ 
DADT Repeal Stand-Alone Bill Introduced in the House

December 14th, 2010 at 11:06 am
Today House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and Rep. Patrick  Murphy introduced a free-standing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) repeal  bill in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-CT)  and Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced the companion bill, S.4023, last  week after the failed Senate vote to proceed to debate on the National  Defense Authorization Act.  The Senate bill currently has 40 bipartisan  cosponsors.
Today’s announcement by Leader Hoyer and Rep. Murphy shows that momentum is on the side of DADT repeal.

DADT Repeal Stand-Alone Bill Introduced in the House

December 14th, 2010 at 11:06 am

Today House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and Rep. Patrick Murphy introduced a free-standing “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) repeal bill in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-CT) and Susan Collins (R-ME) introduced the companion bill, S.4023, last week after the failed Senate vote to proceed to debate on the National Defense Authorization Act.  The Senate bill currently has 40 bipartisan cosponsors.

Today’s announcement by Leader Hoyer and Rep. Murphy shows that momentum is on the side of DADT repeal.

— 3 years ago with 11 notes
#dadt  #don't ask don't tell  #steny hoyer  #patrick murphy  #gay  #rights  #military  #equality  #repeal  #LGBTQ 
Today, a Federal Judge in California declared that the 1993 policy “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” is unconstitutional because it violates the 5th and 1st Amendments. If the U.S. Department of Justice chooses to appeal the decision, the case will be forwarded to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and an appeal from there would shoot the case directly to the United States Supreme Court where it is strongly believed that the California judge’s decision will be upheld. 
The repeal of DADT will not only grant service members their constitutional rights but also pave way for  social integration and acceptance of the LGTBQ community throughout the nation. This kind of embracing of the gay community is sure to lead to other strides in equality. 
Click through the photo to read the Associated Press’ report
  • Today, a Federal Judge in California declared that the 1993 policy “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” is unconstitutional because it violates the 5th and 1st Amendments. If the U.S. Department of Justice chooses to appeal the decision, the case will be forwarded to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and an appeal from there would shoot the case directly to the United States Supreme Court where it is strongly believed that the California judge’s decision will be upheld.
  • The repeal of DADT will not only grant service members their constitutional rights but also pave way for  social integration and acceptance of the LGTBQ community throughout the nation. This kind of embracing of the gay community is sure to lead to other strides in equality.
  • Click through the photo to read the Associated Press’ report
— 3 years ago with 16 notes
#dadt  #don't ask don't tell  #repeal  #gay  #rights  #military  #same-sex  #california 
(UPDATED 8.17.10) What the Ninth Circuit’s Latest Ruling in the Prop 8 Case Means

(UPDATED 8.17.10) What the Ninth Circuit’s Latest Ruling in the Prop 8 Case Means

On August 16, 2010, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals granted the Proposition 8 proponents’ motion to stay U.S. District Court Judge Vaughn Walker’s decision, which means that same-sex couples in California will not be able to marry while the case is on appeal. However, the Ninth Circuit put the appeal on a fast track and specifically directed the Prop 8 proponents to address “why the appeal should not be dismissed for lack of Article III standing” in their opening brief. That means that the Court will consider whether the decision can be appealed at the same time that it is considering whether Judge Walker’s decision that Prop 8 violates the federal constitution is legally correct.

What is the fast-track schedule set by the Ninth Circuit?

All the briefing must be completed by November 1, 2010 and the oral argument will take place the week of December 6, 2010. Proponents’ opening brief is due September 17. The plaintiffs’ opposing brief is due October 18. The proponents’ reply brief is due November 1.

When can we expect a decision from the Ninth Circuit?

The Ninth Circuit is not required to issue its decision within any particular time frame after oral argument; however, when an appeal is expedited, the Court tends to issue decisions more quickly. That said, it is still likely to take at least a few weeks or months after the oral argument in December for the Court to issue a decision.

What happens after the Ninth Circuit rules? Will the case then go to the Supreme Court?

Once the Ninth Circuit rules, the losing side can ask the United States Supreme Court to hear the case. The Supreme Court then has discretion to take the case or to let the Ninth Circuit’s decision stand.

Which three judges from the Ninth Circuit will decide the Prop 8 appeal?

We don’t know yet which three judges will be on the panel for the Ninth Circuit appeal in the Prop 8 case. It’s possible that it will be the three judges who heard an earlier appeal relating to discovery disputes in the case Judges Berzon, Fisher, and Wardlaw but it also might be a different set of three judges. We won’t know for sure until the week of November 29, when the names of the panel judges will be announced.

Could the same panel that granted the stay also decide the appeal?

The panel of judges that decided the stay was the temporary, rotating “motions panel” that sits for a month at a time and only hears motions that need an immediate response. There have been some past cases in which a motions panel keeps a case, so it is possible, but the more common practice is for an appeal to be assigned to a new panel of judges.

Will the Ninth Circuit decide whether the Prop 8 proponents have standing to bring an appeal before the court decides the other issues in the case?

The motions panel that issued the stay ordered the parties to address in their briefs both the question of standing and the question of whether Prop 8 is unconstitutional. So the argument scheduled for the week of December 6 likely will address both of those issues, and it’s unlikely that the question of standing will be separately decided anytime before that.

If the Ninth Circuit decides that the Prop 8 supporters don’t have standing to bring an appeal, will they be able to appeal that ruling to the Supreme Court? Or does the case stop there?

If the Ninth Circuit decides that Prop 8 proponents don’t have standing to bring an appeal, the proponents could ask the Supreme Court to review that decision, and the Supreme Court would have the option either to hear the appeal or to let the Ninth Circuit’s decision stand.

Will the final decision in this case apply to California only?

Judge Walker’s decision is just about California, but much of his legal analysis and many of his factual findings could be applied to other discriminatory marriage laws across the country. If this case reaches the Supreme Court, and if the Court decides to reach the question of whether Prop 8 is constitutional, and if the Justices ultimately decide that Judge Walker was right that Prop 8 is unconstitutional, they could issue that decision either in broad terms that apply to the whole country or in narrow terms that are limited to California.

Source credit: National Center for Lesbian Rights

— 4 years ago with 8 notes
#prop 8  #repeal  #gay rights  #love  #equality  #marriage