Showing posts tagged human rights.
x
Ask us anything   Submit   FAQ   National Resources   

The #1 Tumblr blog for people focused on queer pride and the fight for equal rights.

Our goal is to compile inspiring posts from throughout Tumblr in one place for your convenience. PinkPanthers provides information on legislation, progress, and discrimination throughout the United States and the world. Our philosophy is that we will achieve love and equality through our strength in numbers.

With over 20,000 followers and visitors from 50+ countries, we continue to grow our community. We also urge and encourage you to submit your own pictures, stories, and news pieces!
thetrevorproject:

“Proposition 8 served no purpose, and had no effect, other than to lessen the status and human dignity of gays and lesbians in California,” the courts ruled today.
Reblog this post if you believe everyone should be free to marry the person they love.

thetrevorproject:

“Proposition 8 served no purpose, and had no effect, other than to lessen the status and human dignity of gays and lesbians in California,” the courts ruled today.

Reblog this post if you believe everyone should be free to marry the person they love.

— 2 years ago with 954 notes
#prop 8  #proposition 8  #california  #marriage equality  #same sex marriage  #gay rights  #human rights  #lgbt  #equality  #trevor project  #unconstitutional 
Judge apologizes to inmate seeking transgender surgery →

cheesenippz:

Michelle Kosilek, a convicted murderer, first sued the Massachusetts Department of Correction 11 years ago. Two years later, U.S. District Judge Mark Wolf ruled that Kosilek was entitled to treatment for gender-identity disorder, but stopped short of ordering surgery to complete Kosilek’s physical transition.

Kosilek sued again in 2005, arguing that the female hormones she was receiving were not enough to relieve her anxiety and depression. Kosilek argued that the surgery was a medical necessity and that the Department of Correction was violating her constitutional rights by refusing to provide the operation.

(via pinchefrijolera-deactivated2012)

— 3 years ago with 19 notes
#transexual  #transgender  #mtf  #gender  #sex  #queer  #murder  #human rights  #trans 
Gay rights don’t exist.

Many of us have heard it and some of us have said it; the line, “I’m just not into the whole fighting for gay rights thing.” Of course there are alternatives to how it is said, and gay is used interchangeably with lesbian, queer, lgbt, etc.

However, there is no such thing as “gay rights” or “queer rights” or “LGBT rights” because, rights do not belong to a group. A group cannot have rights. Individuals have rights. These things we fight for are not for a faceless, pulse-free, group. These things that we fight for are human rights, individual rights, personal rights, and people’s rights.

So the next time you want to say, “I’m just not into the whole gay rights thing.” You are actually saying that you aren’t concerned about your rights, your natural rights that exist apart from law and man. 

Join the fight. Not for LGBTQ rights, but for your rights because, you have a name, a pulse, and a heart that deserves more.

— 3 years ago with 19 notes
#lgbt  #gay  #rights  #individual  #human rights  #fight  #LGBTQ 
The Universal Declaration of Queer Rights

The Universal Declaration of Queer Rights

— 3 years ago with 417 notes
#human rights  #gay rights  #queer  #rights  #LGBTQ 
Archbishop Desmond Tutu's Five Best Quotes for Full LGBT Equality →

pansexualpride:

Today marks Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s last official day as someone publicly engaged in human rights work. The good bishop, who has been pushing for equality among races, genders and sexual orientations for decades, is set to retire today, capping off a legendary career that has made him a worldwide icon for peace and justice.

Though Archbishop Desmond Tutu may be most closely associated with ending apartheid and championing racial justice and reconciliation in South Africa, the Archbishop has become a leading supporter of full LGBT equality in recent years. Commenting on his Tutu’s retirement, even U.S. President Barack Obama noted the work that the Archbishop has done to benefit LGBT rights worldwide.

“He has … been an outspoken voice for freedom and justice in countries across the globe; a staunch defender of the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons; and an advocate for treatment and prevention programs to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS,” President Obama said in an official statement. “We will miss his insight and his activism, but will continue to learn from his example.”

Here’s hoping. We need a lot more people learning from the example of Desmond Tutu than, say, the example of Mormon leader Boyd Packer, who blasted gays and lesbians in a recent sermon, calling LGBT people “impure and unnatural.” Thoughts like that would never even cross the mind of someone like Desmond Tutu. Which is why the world is celebrating his spirit today.

In that regard, here are five quotes from Desmond Tutu that speak volumes about his commitment to LGBT equality. Eloquent? Indeed they are. Inspiring? Absolutely.

1. “I am deeply, deeply distressed that in the face of the most horrendous problems — we’ve got poverty, we’ve got conflict and war, we’ve got HIV/AIDS — and what do we concentrate on? We concentrate on what you are doing in bed.” - Archbishop Desmond Tutu gave this quote at a conference in Kenya in 2008. The reason it’s so good? Because all too often, religious leaders (hello, Minnesota Catholic Bishops) focus on who people choose to love, rather than critical social problems like poverty, health, or war.

2. “We struggled against apartheid in South Africa, supported by people the world over, because black people were being blamed and made to suffer for something we could do nothing about; our very skins. It is the same with sexual orientation. It is a given.” - Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote this in 2007, in the wake of the launch of a book by Amnesty International UK, “Sex, Love and Homophobia.” The point? That people are born who they are, and to discriminate against them on the basis of a natural characteristic is both flawed and immoral.

3. “When will we learn that human beings are of infinite value because they have been created in the image of God, and that it is a blasphemy to treat them as if they were less than this and to do so ultimately recoils on those who do this? In dehumanizing others, they are themselves dehumanized. Perhaps oppression dehumanizes the oppressor as much as, if not more than, the oppressed. They need each other to become truly free, to become human.” - This was part of Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s Nobel Peace Prize address in 1984, when he was honored for his work to end apartheid. Doesn’t tie specifically in to LGBT rights, of course, but the theme there is pretty clear: those who would oppress others violate one of the central tenets of humanity.

4. “If God, as they say, is homophobic, I wouldn’t worship that God.” - Archbishop Desmond Tutu said this nugget in an interview with the BBC in 2007. At the time, it was direct and very blunt criticism at the Anglican Church for its seemingly endless focus on questions of sexuality, instead of actual social problems in the world. Pretty powerful stuff to have someone like an Archbishop say that he’d abandon his own religion if he ever believed God was homophobic.

5. “Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people are part of so many families. They are part of the human family. They are part of God’s family. And of course they are part of the African family.” -Archbishop Desmond Tutu wrote this in March 2010, addressing directly efforts in Uganda (and other parts of Africa) to criminalize homosexuality with harsh penalties, including even the death penalty. It was both a call to remember that we’re all a part of the same human existence, but also a call that homosexuality is indeed part and parcel of Africa’s identity.

Archbishop Tutu: you are seriously going to be missed. Enjoy your retirement. You’ve more than earned it.

(Source: )

— 3 years ago with 40 notes
#archbishop  #desmond tutu  #quotes  #LGBT  #equality  #human rights  #amazing 
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States, in a reversal of Bush administration policy, has decided to sign on to a U.N. declaration that calls for the decriminalization of homosexuality, the State Department said on Wednesday.
U.S. |  FRANCE |  JAPAN
State Department spokesman Robert Wood said the Obama administration, which took office eight weeks ago, would now join 66 other U.N. member states who supported a U.N. statement in December that condemned human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity.
"The United States is an outspoken defender of human rights and critic of human rights abuses around the world," Wood told reporters.
"As such, we join with other supporters of this statement, and we will continue to remind countries of the importance of respecting the human rights of all people in all appropriate international fora."
Gay rights groups immediately welcomed the move.
"The administration’s leadership on this issue will be a powerful rebuke of an earlier Bush administration position that sought to deny the universal application of human rights protections to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals," said Mark Bromley, who chairs the Council for Global Equality.
The U.N. General Assembly had been split over the issue of gay rights, with many Muslim countries refusing to sign on to the statement because of opposition to international attempts to legalize homosexuality.
A rival statement read out by Syria at the time gathered about 60 signatures from the 192-nation assembly.
The United States was the only western state not to sign on to the gay rights document. All European Union member states endorsed it, as did Canada, Australia and Japan.
'NO LEGAL OBLIGATIONS'
In a move that angered U.S. gay rights groups, the Bush administration argued that the broad framing of the language in the statement created conflict with U.S. laws.
The rationale was that favoring gay rights in a U.N. document might be interpreted as an attempt by the U.S. federal government to override individual states’ rights on issues like gay marriage.
Pressed on this issue, Wood said a “careful” interagency review by the Obama administration found that signing on to the U.N. document “commits us to no legal obligations.”
Division in the General Assembly over the U.N. declaration reflects conflicting laws worldwide on the issue.
According to the sponsors of the Franco-Dutch text of the document, homosexuality is illegal in 77 countries, seven of which punish it by death.
At a townhall meeting in Brussels earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was pressed on her views on gay rights.
"Human rights is and always will be one of the pillars of our foreign policy," she said. "In particular, persecution and discrimination against gays and lesbians is something we take very seriously."
(Additional reporting by Patrick Worsnip at the United Nations; Editing by John O’Callaghan)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States, in a reversal of Bush administration policy, has decided to sign on to a U.N. declaration that calls for the decriminalization of homosexuality, the State Department said on Wednesday.

U.S. |  FRANCE |  JAPAN

State Department spokesman Robert Wood said the Obama administration, which took office eight weeks ago, would now join 66 other U.N. member states who supported a U.N. statement in December that condemned human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

"The United States is an outspoken defender of human rights and critic of human rights abuses around the world," Wood told reporters.

"As such, we join with other supporters of this statement, and we will continue to remind countries of the importance of respecting the human rights of all people in all appropriate international fora."

Gay rights groups immediately welcomed the move.

"The administration’s leadership on this issue will be a powerful rebuke of an earlier Bush administration position that sought to deny the universal application of human rights protections to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals," said Mark Bromley, who chairs the Council for Global Equality.

The U.N. General Assembly had been split over the issue of gay rights, with many Muslim countries refusing to sign on to the statement because of opposition to international attempts to legalize homosexuality.

A rival statement read out by Syria at the time gathered about 60 signatures from the 192-nation assembly.

The United States was the only western state not to sign on to the gay rights document. All European Union member states endorsed it, as did Canada, Australia and Japan.

'NO LEGAL OBLIGATIONS'

In a move that angered U.S. gay rights groups, the Bush administration argued that the broad framing of the language in the statement created conflict with U.S. laws.

The rationale was that favoring gay rights in a U.N. document might be interpreted as an attempt by the U.S. federal government to override individual states’ rights on issues like gay marriage.

Pressed on this issue, Wood said a “careful” interagency review by the Obama administration found that signing on to the U.N. document “commits us to no legal obligations.”

Division in the General Assembly over the U.N. declaration reflects conflicting laws worldwide on the issue.

According to the sponsors of the Franco-Dutch text of the document, homosexuality is illegal in 77 countries, seven of which punish it by death.

At a townhall meeting in Brussels earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was pressed on her views on gay rights.

"Human rights is and always will be one of the pillars of our foreign policy," she said. "In particular, persecution and discrimination against gays and lesbians is something we take very seriously."

(Additional reporting by Patrick Worsnip at the United Nations; Editing by John O’Callaghan)

— 4 years ago
#LGBT  #Gay  #Equal  #civil Rights  #Human rights  #Homosexuality  #news  #politics  #obama administration  #bush administration  #hilary clinton  #foreign policy