Showing posts tagged Civil Rights.
x
Ask us anything   Submit   FAQ   National Resources   

The #1 Tumblr blog for people focused on queer pride and the fight for equal rights.

Our goal is to compile inspiring posts from throughout Tumblr in one place for your convenience. PinkPanthers provides information on legislation, progress, and discrimination throughout the United States and the world. Our philosophy is that we will achieve love and equality through our strength in numbers.

With over 20,000 followers and visitors from 50+ countries, we continue to grow our community. We also urge and encourage you to submit your own pictures, stories, and news pieces!
Proposition 8 same-sex marriage fight headed to U.S. Supreme Court →

occupymyfuck:

U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals votes not to review smaller panel’s overturning of California’s gay marriage ban. High court is expected to review Prop. 8 this fall.

(Source: gaywasted)

— 1 year ago with 19 notes
#Gay  #Queer  #Gay Rights  #Civil Rights  #Queer Rights  #LGBT  #LGBTIIQQAA  #LGBT Rights  #Same-Sex Marriage  #Prop 8  #California  #Marriage  #Equality 
NAACP backs same-sex marriage as civil right →

occupymyfuck:

The NAACP passed a resolution Saturday endorsing same-sex marriage as a civil right and opposing any efforts “to codify discrimination or hatred into the law.”

(Source: gaywasted)

— 1 year ago with 94 notes
#Gay Rights  #Civil Rights  #LGBTIIQQAA  #Gay  #NAACP 
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States, in a reversal of Bush administration policy, has decided to sign on to a U.N. declaration that calls for the decriminalization of homosexuality, the State Department said on Wednesday.
U.S. |  FRANCE |  JAPAN
State Department spokesman Robert Wood said the Obama administration, which took office eight weeks ago, would now join 66 other U.N. member states who supported a U.N. statement in December that condemned human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity.
"The United States is an outspoken defender of human rights and critic of human rights abuses around the world," Wood told reporters.
"As such, we join with other supporters of this statement, and we will continue to remind countries of the importance of respecting the human rights of all people in all appropriate international fora."
Gay rights groups immediately welcomed the move.
"The administration’s leadership on this issue will be a powerful rebuke of an earlier Bush administration position that sought to deny the universal application of human rights protections to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals," said Mark Bromley, who chairs the Council for Global Equality.
The U.N. General Assembly had been split over the issue of gay rights, with many Muslim countries refusing to sign on to the statement because of opposition to international attempts to legalize homosexuality.
A rival statement read out by Syria at the time gathered about 60 signatures from the 192-nation assembly.
The United States was the only western state not to sign on to the gay rights document. All European Union member states endorsed it, as did Canada, Australia and Japan.
'NO LEGAL OBLIGATIONS'
In a move that angered U.S. gay rights groups, the Bush administration argued that the broad framing of the language in the statement created conflict with U.S. laws.
The rationale was that favoring gay rights in a U.N. document might be interpreted as an attempt by the U.S. federal government to override individual states’ rights on issues like gay marriage.
Pressed on this issue, Wood said a “careful” interagency review by the Obama administration found that signing on to the U.N. document “commits us to no legal obligations.”
Division in the General Assembly over the U.N. declaration reflects conflicting laws worldwide on the issue.
According to the sponsors of the Franco-Dutch text of the document, homosexuality is illegal in 77 countries, seven of which punish it by death.
At a townhall meeting in Brussels earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was pressed on her views on gay rights.
"Human rights is and always will be one of the pillars of our foreign policy," she said. "In particular, persecution and discrimination against gays and lesbians is something we take very seriously."
(Additional reporting by Patrick Worsnip at the United Nations; Editing by John O’Callaghan)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States, in a reversal of Bush administration policy, has decided to sign on to a U.N. declaration that calls for the decriminalization of homosexuality, the State Department said on Wednesday.

U.S. |  FRANCE |  JAPAN

State Department spokesman Robert Wood said the Obama administration, which took office eight weeks ago, would now join 66 other U.N. member states who supported a U.N. statement in December that condemned human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

"The United States is an outspoken defender of human rights and critic of human rights abuses around the world," Wood told reporters.

"As such, we join with other supporters of this statement, and we will continue to remind countries of the importance of respecting the human rights of all people in all appropriate international fora."

Gay rights groups immediately welcomed the move.

"The administration’s leadership on this issue will be a powerful rebuke of an earlier Bush administration position that sought to deny the universal application of human rights protections to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals," said Mark Bromley, who chairs the Council for Global Equality.

The U.N. General Assembly had been split over the issue of gay rights, with many Muslim countries refusing to sign on to the statement because of opposition to international attempts to legalize homosexuality.

A rival statement read out by Syria at the time gathered about 60 signatures from the 192-nation assembly.

The United States was the only western state not to sign on to the gay rights document. All European Union member states endorsed it, as did Canada, Australia and Japan.

'NO LEGAL OBLIGATIONS'

In a move that angered U.S. gay rights groups, the Bush administration argued that the broad framing of the language in the statement created conflict with U.S. laws.

The rationale was that favoring gay rights in a U.N. document might be interpreted as an attempt by the U.S. federal government to override individual states’ rights on issues like gay marriage.

Pressed on this issue, Wood said a “careful” interagency review by the Obama administration found that signing on to the U.N. document “commits us to no legal obligations.”

Division in the General Assembly over the U.N. declaration reflects conflicting laws worldwide on the issue.

According to the sponsors of the Franco-Dutch text of the document, homosexuality is illegal in 77 countries, seven of which punish it by death.

At a townhall meeting in Brussels earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was pressed on her views on gay rights.

"Human rights is and always will be one of the pillars of our foreign policy," she said. "In particular, persecution and discrimination against gays and lesbians is something we take very seriously."

(Additional reporting by Patrick Worsnip at the United Nations; Editing by John O’Callaghan)

— 4 years ago
#LGBT  #Gay  #Equal  #civil Rights  #Human rights  #Homosexuality  #news  #politics  #obama administration  #bush administration  #hilary clinton  #foreign policy 
037-Gay Marriage Rallies March-May ‘04 (via Violentz)

037-Gay Marriage Rallies March-May ‘04 (via Violentz)

— 4 years ago with 4 notes
#LGBT  #Gay  #Equal  #Marriage  #Rights  #Protest  #Signs  #separate  #civil rights